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  • It's wise to take an active role in protecting your kids from Internet predators and sexually explicit materials online. To do that:

    • Create an Internet Family Rules contract and discuss it frequently with your children.
    • Become computer literate and learn how to block objectionable material.
    • Keep the computer in a common area, not in individual bedrooms, where you can watch and monitor its use.
    • Share an email account with your child so you can monitor messages.
    • Bookmark kids' favorite sites for easy access.
    • Spend time online together to teach your kids appropriate online behavior.
    • Forbid your child from entering private chat rooms; block them with safety features provided by your Internet service provider or with special filtering software. Be aware that posting messages to chat rooms reveals a user's email address to others.
    • Monitor your credit card and phone bills for unfamiliar account charges.
    • Find out what, if any, online protection is offered by your child's school, after-school center, friends' homes, or anyplace where kids could use a computer without your supervision.
    • Take your child seriously if he or she reports an uncomfortable online exchange.
    • Forward copies of obscene or threatening messages you or your kids get to your Internet service provider.
    • Call the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at (800) 843-5678 if you're aware of the transmission, use, or viewing of child pornography online. Contact your local law enforcement agency or the FBI if your child has received child pornography via the Internet.
  • If your children use the Internet at home, you already know how important it is to help protect them from inappropriate content and contact.

    Windows Live Family Safety and the parental controls included in Windows 7 and Windows Vista can help you create a safer online environment for your children.

    The American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) helped Microsoft develop age-based guidance for Internet use with the family safety settings in both of these products. It's important to remember that these are guidelines only. You know your child best.

    http://www.microsoft.com/security/family-safety/childsafety-age.aspx

    • Supervise your children until they are age 10. You can use Internet safety tools to limit access to content, websites, and activities, and be actively involved in your child's Internet use, but Microsoft recommends that you sit with your child when they use the Internet, until the age of 10.

      Here are some safety tips to consider when you go online with your 2-10 year old:

      1. It's never too early to foster open and positive communication with children. It's a good idea to talk with them about computers and to stay open to their questions and curiosity.
      2. Always sit with your kids at this age when they're online.
      3. Set clear rules for Internet use.
      4. Insist that your children not share personal information such as their real name, address, phone number, or passwords with people they meet online.
      5. If a site encourages kids to submit their names to personalize the web content, help your kids create online nicknames that don't give away personal information.
      6. Use family safety tools to create appropriate profiles for each family member and to help filter the Internet.
      7. For more information, see Windows Live Family Safety, Windows 7 Parental Controls, or Windows Vista Parental Controls.
      8. Help protect your children from offensive pop-up windows by using the pop-up blocker that's built in to Internet Explorer.
      9. All family members should act as role models for young children who are just starting to use the Internet.
    • Children this age are savvier about their Internet experience, but it's still a good idea to supervise and monitor their Internet use to help ensure they are not exposed to inappropriate materials. You can use Internet safety tools to limit access to content and websites and provide a report of Internet activities. Make sure children this age understand what personal information they should not give over the Internet.

      When your kids are this age it might not be practical to physically supervise their Internet use at all times. You can use tools such as Windows Live Family Safety, Windows 7 Parental Controls, or Windows Vista Parental Controls.

      Here are some safety tips to consider when you go online with your 11-14 year old:

      1. It's a good idea to foster open and positive communication with your children. Talk with them about computers and stay open to their questions and curiosity.
      2. Set clear rules for Internet use.
      3. Insist that your children not share personal information such as their real name, address, phone number, or passwords with people they meet online.
      4. If a site encourages kids to submit their names to personalize the web content, help your kids create online nicknames that give away no personal information.
      5. Use family safety tools to create appropriate profiles for each family member and to help filter the Internet.
      6. For more information, see Windows Live Family Safety, Windows 7 Parental Controls, or Windows Vista Parental Controls.
      7. Set family safety tools on the medium security setting, which should have some limitations on content, websites, and activities.
      8. Keep Internet-connected computers in an open area where you can easily supervise your kids' activities.
      9. Help protect your children from offensive pop-up windows by using the pop-up blocker that's built in to Internet Explorer.
      10. Encourage your children to tell you if something or someone online makes them feel uncomfortable or threatened. Stay calm and remind your kids they are not in trouble for bringing something to your attention. Praise their behavior and encourage them to come to you again if the same thing happens.
    • Teens should have almost limitless access to content, websites, or activities. They are savvy about the Internet but they still need parents to remind them of appropriate safety guidelines. Parents should be available to help their teens understand inappropriate messages and avoid unsafe situations. It's a good idea for parents to remind teens what personal information should not be given over the Internet.

      Here are some safety tips to consider as you guide your teens online:

      1. Continue to keep family communication as open and positive about computers as you can. Keep talking about online lives, friends, and activities, just as you would about other friends and activities.
      2. Encourage your teens to tell you if something or someone online makes them feel uncomfortable or threatened. If you're a teen and something or someone online doesn't seem quite right, then speak up.
      3. Create a list of Internet house rules as a family. Include the kinds of sites that are off limits, Internet hours, what information should not be shared online, and guidelines for communicating with others online, including social networking.
      4. Keep Internet-connected computers in an open area and not in a teen's bedroom.
      5. Investigate Internet-filtering tools (such as Windows Vista Parental Controls, Windows 7 Parental Controls, or Windows Live Family Safety) as a complement to parental supervision.
      6. Help protect your children from offensive pop-up windows by using the pop-up blocker that's built in to Internet Explorer.
      7. Know which websites your teens visit, and whom they talk to. Encourage them to use monitored chat rooms, and insist they stay in public chat room area.
      8. Insist that they never agree to meet an online friend.
      9. Teach your kids not to download programs, music, or files without your permission. File-sharing and taking text, images, or artwork from the web may infringe on copyright laws and can be illegal.
      10. Talk to your teenagers about online adult content and pornography, and direct them to positive sites about health and sexuality.
      11. Help protect them from spam. Tell your teens not to give out their email address online, not to respond to junk mail, and to use email filters.
      12. Be aware of the websites that your teens frequent. Make sure your kids are not visiting sites with offensive content, or posting personal information. Be aware of the photos that teens post of themselves and their friends.
      13. Teach your kids responsible, ethical, online behavior. They should not be using the Internet to spread gossip, bully, or threaten others.
      14. Make sure your teens check with you before making financial transactions online, including ordering, buying, or selling items.
      15. Discuss online gambling and its potential risks with your teens. Remind them that it is illegal for them to gamble online.
  • Make it a Family Rule to:

    Never give out identifying or personal information – home address, school name, telephone number, workplace or age – in chat rooms or bulletin boards (including social network sites)

    Know the lingo used by teenagers

    Utilize the filtering features built into the more popular internet browsers and software programs that filter areas known to be inappropriate for children

    Never allow your children to arrange a face-to-face meeting with someone they’ve “met” online unless you’re with them

    Only allow your child to use the computer or internet capable system in a common area of your home and in the presence of an adult

    Talk to your child about what sites he or she uses on the internet and visit them together

    Obtain your child’s screen names and passwords. Be sure that screen names are age appropriate and do not reveal personal information, such as name, age, school (including mascot), or hobbies

    Use the PARENTAL CONTROL settings on your computer to check the internet history and to archive chat sessions. Install a keystroke logger if you think that will help you track your child’s activity.

    FROM http://myfloridalegal.com/

  • Internet Explorer

    To Browse History:

    Click on “View”
    Click on “Explorer Bar”
    Click on “History”

    Or

    Ctrl+Shift+H to pull up the history

    To view Recent Downloads:

    Click on the “Tools” and select “Internet Options”
    Under “Browsing History” Select “Settings”
    Click “View Files”

    To view Cookies:

    Click on the “Tools” and select “Internet Options”
    Under “Browsing History” select “Settings”
    Click “View Files”
    Cookies will be listed as “Cookie…”

    Mozilla Firefox

    To Browse History:

    Click on the “History” tab (found at the top of your browser after it is open)
    Click on “History Show-All” or simply hit “CTRL” and “H” keys at the same time

    To view Recent Downloads:

    Click on the “Tools” and select “Downloads”

    Or

    Ctrl+J to pull up the downloaded files history

    To view Cookies:

    Click on the “Tools” tab (found at the top of your browser after it is open)
    Show Cookies

    Safari

    To Browse History:

    Click on the “History”
    Click on “Show All History”
    Scroll or search through results

    To view Recent Searches:

    Click on “Window” and select “Downloads”
    View downloaded files

    FROM http://myfloridalegal.com/

  • The location of the family computer(s) in your household may turn into a raging debate as your children get older. The battle lines are drawn between your child wanting privacy, the needs of other family members to access the machine(s) and concerns you may have over the safety of your children while online. Whether you have one computer in the house or five, there are some issues that need to be taken into account. Consider the impacts of each of the following factors as you make a final decision.

    • The first and foremost consideration in placing a family computer should be the safety of your children. There is a certain amount of risk involved in allowing children to have a computer with Internet access in their rooms with no parental supervision. They are much more likely to share inappropriate info, chat with strangers, and engage in other risky behaviors if they know that no one will be watching. If you would not allow your child to travel to a new city without an adult present, you should take the same precautions online. Kids who surf online have the potential to be exposed to many of the same dangers as those in other unsupervised settings.

      This does not mean that you cannot allow your children to have a computer in their rooms. Consider allowing a computer without Internet access, or with limited access. This is especially useful for teens who use the computer for creative projects, playing video games and listening to music. Keep in mind, however, that it is likely that your kids are more computer savvy than you are and may get around any blocks you have in place.

    • The way your household computers are used will play a large role in determining where they should be located. A machine used primarily for homework will need to be in a somewhat quiet location where there is low traffic. One used for chatting online can be in the room where most of the family spends their time. If Mom and Dad use a computer for work or for tracking household expenses, those needs will also have to be taken into account.

    • As obvious as it may seem, space is a necessary factor in computer placement. The computer will need an outlet, plenty of desk space and, ideally, a spot away from the glare of windows. You will not want it located in a room where your kids may be roughhousing.

    • Generally speaking, a family computer should be located in a common area. Ideally, it will be secluded enough to provide a quiet workspace when needed, but public enough to ensure safety. The space should be large enough for more than one person, to promote social interaction, and accessible enough for parents to check –in on a regular basis. By taking into account all of these factors, you can make the best choice for your family situation.

    http://familyinternet.about.com/od/introtofamilycomputing/a/computerlocate.htm